The Man with longest Moustache in the World

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Rajasthan is a rich blend of colours, cultures, festivals, celebrations and traditions. For some it is the festivals that attract them towards the state while others visit the state for its royal grandeur. There are certain other elements that distinguishes or we can say highlights Rajasthan on global arena – its unusually incredible and unique places, people and ceremonies.

Today we’ll introduce to you an incredible man who offers great pride to his moustache. Oh no, not the usual moustache……..

Ram Singh Chauhan from Rajasthan is inching his way to a hair-raising record as the owner of world’s longest moustache according to the Guinness Book of World Records. The 58-year-old is the proud owner of the world’s longest moustache – at an astonishing 14 feet long.

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Chauhan, who hails from the city of Jaipur in Rajasthan state, says his whiskers are his ‘most prized possession’. He has spent an incredible 32 years cultivating the tash – which he spends two hours a day grooming.

Chauhan, whose facial fur has even landed him a part in the James Bond movie ‘Octopussy’, said: ‘Growing a moustache is like taking care of a baby – you really need to nurture it. ‘It has taken me a long, long time to get it to 14 feet. It’s not been an easy task.’ Chauhan started growing his moustache during his late teens. ‘I haven’t used a shaving blade on my moustache, or trimmed them since 1970,’ he said. ‘The moustache is the symbol of pride and respect.

longest-moustache

In ancient India, a moustache meant everything. ‘It is priceless. It’s a man thing.’ Chauhan, whose feat has been recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records, is still cultivating his tash. Despite a number of contenders to his title, no others have come close to the mark. He said: ‘When I first started to grow my moustache, I did not intend to break any record. His long hair has turned him into an international celebrity with people jostling to be photographed with him, wherever he goes.

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These are currently the longest moustache in the world we will see if someone will try to beat the world record.

Ghoomar listed among the world’s 10 most amazing local dances

Ghoomar, a folk dance of Rajasthan, has found its way into the list of world’s most amazing local dances after an international travel website ranked it fourth on the list.

The ochre expanse of the Thar Desert of Rajasthan comes alive with the visual relief of its brightly dressed inhabitants; and when its dancers take the center stage, you just cannot stop tapping your feet. The Ghoomar Dance is one of the most popular folk dances of Rajasthan.

Ghoomar is not just a display of rhythmic talent; its graceful performance in conjunction with the twirling of colourful, long-flowing skirts elevates its aesthetic appeal. It is performed by women arranged in circles occasionally snapping or clapping sometimes accompanied by men who are also expected to sing together. They move in clockwise or anticlockwise direction and when they dance the grace and the vibrant colours of ghaghra (skirts) can be seen.

Like so many folk dances, Ghoomar is usually performed during special occasions to worship religious deities

6 HILL FORTS OF RAJASTHAN NOW IN UNESCO’S WORLD HERITAGE LIST

Cheer spread in the tourism as well as the art and culture sector today in Rajasthan when its 6 hill forts were selected to be in the UNESCO’s World Heritage List. The hills forts are – Amber, Chittorgarh, Gangron, Jaisalmer, Kumbhalgarh and Ranthambore. The Tourism, Art & Culture Minister, Ms. Bina Kak said: “the selection of these forts is a reflection of our work done in the past. We stand by our commitment towards conservation and protection of our rich cultural heritage, of which we are immensely proud.”

 

Kumbhalgarh Fort

Kumbhalgarh Fort

Gagron Fort

Gagron Fort

Jaisalmer Fort

Jaisalmer Fort

Chittorgarh-Fort

Chittorgarh-Fort

Amer Fort, Jaipur

Amer Fort, Jaipur

RANTHAMBHORE-Fort

RANTHAMBHORE-Fort

These hill forts were approved in the 37th Meeting of the World Heritage Committee in Cambodia on 21 June. The selection of these forts, located in different cities, as a serial cultural property, is the first of its kind ever by UNESCO.

Now with the selection by UNESCO these six forts will receive enhanced international recognition the way the Jantar Mantar in Jaipur did after being selected in the World Heritage List in 2010. This selection will also pave way for other monuments to be nominated for being included in the World Heritage List. In fact, the work relating to Stepwells of Abhaneri, Bandikui, Bundi as well as the Fresco paintings of Shekhawati region for being submitted for consideration to UNESCO list has already started.

All these efforts will sure reinforce positioning of Rajasthan on the world tourism map as a favored tourist destination.

It is to be recalled that several missions of ICOMOS (advisory body to UNESCO) visited Rajasthan since 2011 and discussed the nomination in great detail with State Archaeology Department, ASI and the Indian Advisory Committee on the World Heritage under the Ministry of Culture.

Within the State of Rajasthan, six extensive and majestic hill forts together reflect the elaborate, fortified seats of power of Rajput princely states that flourished between the 8th and 18th centuries and their relative political independence. The extensive fortifications up to 20 kilometres in circumference optimized various kinds of hilly terrain, specifically the river at Gagron, the dense forests at Ranthambore, and the desert at Jaisalmer, and exhibit important phase of development of an architectural typology based on established “traditional Indian principles”.

Nagaur Fort among 20 finalists for Aga Khan Award 2013!

The shortlist of nominees for the 2013 cycle of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture was recently announced. The 12th century Nagaur Fort, which has been under the private domain’s largest architectural conservation, has made it to the shortlisted nominee list for US$ 1 million Aga Khan Award for Architecture 2013.

Nagaur Fort

The award is conferred in recognition of architectural excellence in the field of historic preservation, reuse and area conservation, as well as landscape design and improvement of the environment.

The conservation project at Nagaur Fort shortlisted from 800 nominations is among the 20 finalists. Five to six finalists will then be selected and announced at a ceremony to be held in Lisbon in September 2013.

Rehabilitation of Nagaur Fort, Nagaur, Rajasthan, India

At the heart of the ancient city of Nagaur, one of the first Muslim strongholds in northern India is the fort of Ahhichatragarh, built in the early 12th century and repeatedly altered over subsequent centuries. The project for its rehabilitation, involving the training of many artisanal craftsmen, adhered to principles of minimum intervention. Materials and construction methods of an earlier era were rediscovered, paintings and architectural features conserved, and the historic pattern of access through seven successive gates re-created. The finding and restoration of the intricate water system was a highlight: 90 fountains are now running in the gardens and buildings, where none were functional at the project’s outset.

The fort’s buildings and spaces, both external and internal, serve as venue, stage and home to the Sufi Music Festival.

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